Teacher LP

Wealthy nations pledged billions to help the poor adapt to climate change. Where did it all go?
What does this climate aid actually look like? Where has it all gone so far? And are wealthy nations really going to put up $100 billion per year in climate finance in the years to come? Here’s a breakdown:
—2010-2012: The first $35 billion in climate aid. Between 2010 and 2012, the world’s wealthy nations say they provided $35 billion to help poorer countries adjust to climate change, as promised at Copenhagen. (You can see a full breakdown of these pledges from the World Resources Institute here.)
The vast majority of that aid — $27 billion — came from five countries: Germany, Japan, Norway, Britain, and the United States. And most of it went toward clean energy, efficiency, and other mitigation projects around the world. Only a small slice, about $5 billion, went toward helping poor countries prepare for the actual impacts of climate change, like droughts or heat waves.
For instance, Norway gave Brazil $1 billion to help prevent deforestation. The United States gave the Congo Basin $15.7 million to preserve rain forest biodiversity. Japan gave Egypt a $338 million loan for wind power. Via
WaPo

Wealthy nations pledged billions to help the poor adapt to climate change. Where did it all go?

What does this climate aid actually look like? Where has it all gone so far? And are wealthy nations really going to put up $100 billion per year in climate finance in the years to come? Here’s a breakdown:

—2010-2012: The first $35 billion in climate aid. Between 2010 and 2012, the world’s wealthy nations say they provided $35 billion to help poorer countries adjust to climate change, as promised at Copenhagen. (You can see a full breakdown of these pledges from the World Resources Institute here.)

The vast majority of that aid — $27 billion — came from five countries: Germany, Japan, Norway, Britain, and the United States. And most of it went toward clean energy, efficiency, and other mitigation projects around the world. Only a small slice, about $5 billion, went toward helping poor countries prepare for the actual impacts of climate change, like droughts or heat waves.

For instance, Norway gave Brazil $1 billion to help prevent deforestation. The United States gave the Congo Basin $15.7 million to preserve rain forest biodiversity. Japan gave Egypt a $338 million loan for wind power. Via

nprradiopictures:

NPR photographer David Gilkey has photographed in extreme situations — from the surge in Afghanistan, to bombings in Gaza, to the tsunami in Japan, but nothing could have prepared him for what he saw in the village of Barangay 68 in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Nothing could have prepared me for what I was going to find when I arrived in Barangay 68.

"Barangay," loosely translated, means a neighborhood or village and Barangay 68 is just one of the tiny hamlets that make up greater Tacloban City in the central Philippines. The village was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

A wall of debris blocked the streets. I made my way through caverns of shattered timber and when I reached the top of the debris pile the scene was mind numbing. Ships were strewn across the hillside. Containers resting in piles of timber looked like spilled matchboxes. The only uncluttered space was the bay and the water falling away in the distance.

What I Saw: A Photographer’s Last Dispatch From The Philippines

Photo Credit: David Gilkey/NPR

Water Aid is a sustainable solution to the water crisis.

Do you agree?

This assessment will investigate whether this statement is true or not.

Your investigation is divided into different sections: Introduction, the problems, the solutions, the analysis and finally the conclusion.  Your conclusion at the end of your investigation needs to agree or disagree with the title; Water Aid is a sustainable solution to the water crisis. 

Use the web links for your research, write ideas down in your plan and most importantly make use of the key terms in the box below.

Introduction

What is a water crisis?  You need to give some global statistics on people with and without access to clean water and proper sanitation. What does the word sanitation mean? How many people are we talking about? Why does it matter if people don’t have access to clean water? Does it affect people’s quality of life? How?

www.charitywater.org/whywater/

www.wateraid.org/uk/learn_zone/homework/statistics/default.asp

http://water.org/learn-about-the-water-crisis/facts/

Section 1 – Problems

 

You need to explain how a person’s quality of life is lowered by not having access to clean water.  Write about some of the things people have to do to get their water e.g. how is it collected? How many times a day? Who collects it? Is the water that’s collected clean? It’s not just about clean water but sanitation too. Why do people need to have sanitation and hygiene? It would be good to give at least one example from a country. Think about what you have done in class in the lead up to this essay. 

www.wateraid.org

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drinking_water

 

 

Section 2 - Solutions

 

How do improvements in clean water supply lead to major improvements in a village and / or community? Can you find an example of a community in a country where a small-scale project has been put in, such as a well? Write how NGOs have been involved in this e.g. Water Aid.

www.wateraid.org/uk/what_we_do/where_we_work/default.asp

www.waterislife.com/projects/

What is the UN doing to help people gain access to clean water and sanitation? This links back to the Millennium Development Goals, show how water links in here. Why is access to clean water and sanitation a global issue?

www.wateraid.org/uk/what_we_do/the_need/3045.asp

www.unesco.org/water/wwap/facts_figures/mdgs.shtml

 

Section 3 – Analysis

Water is a precious resource and needs to be conserved (looked after). What does the term sustainability mean? Why might this be important for water? How is this possible? You could pick one of the projects to show how Water for Life is promoting the safe and sustainable use of water.  Do you think individuals, communities and governments can do more to help with access to clean water supplies? 

www.waterforlife.org/about.php

www.wateraid.org/uk/what_we_do/sustainable_technologies/default.asp

 

Conclusion

Do you agree with the hypothesis?  To what extent is Aid a sustainable solution to the water crisis? Put your opinion in here.  Don’t add any new information but also don’t repeat.

Assessment

See the assessment matrix.

Include a word count – no more than 1000 words.  Minimum 500 words. 

Have a go at writing a bibliography (not a simple list of websites) and citing your sources in your writing.  This website should help you:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/02/

Key terms

Sanitation

Poverty

MDGs

Developing countries

Disease

Quality of life

Community

NGO

Aid

Charity

Hygiene

Sustainability

United Nations

MEDCs

Government

Resource

Conservation

Water pump

Well

How are different charities are helping?

Finish For Homework: Due: Wednesday 20th

Choose one charity.  Look at their website to answer the following questions: 

What is the situation in the Philippinnes? Why do they need aid? What are the social, economic and environmental effects of the Typhoon?  

How is the charity helping?  Is it short or long term aid?  Give examples.

How do they raise money?

How can you help?

Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong