Teacher LP

climateadaptation:

Palm oil is delicious. It’s used in crackers and candy. It’s a plant that’s grown in tropical areas, mostly Indonesia. Rainforests are burned down to make room to plant the crop. Tens of thousands of animals are killed by the burning. This short video shows the impacts of palm oil production on orangutans. It’s one of three tough-to-stomach documentaries on rainforest destruction.

WARNING: This video is brutal and raw. Guys, I am not messing around here. Parts are extremely graphic.

Her name is GREEN, she is alone in a world that doesn’t belong to her. She is a female orangutan, victim of deforestation and resource exploitation. This film is an emotional journey with GREEN’s final days. With no narration, it is a visual ride presenting the devastating impacts of logging and land clearing for palm oil plantations, the choking haze created by rainforest fires and the tragic end of rainforest biodiversity. We watch the effects of consumerism and are faced with our personal accountability in the loss of the world’s rainforest treasures.

More from Green Planet Films.

onearth:

From aircraft flying high above Earth, photographer J Henry Fair captures the industrial footprint humans leave behind from unique angles. His beautiful and startling aerial photography was the centerpiece of a talk given last fall at the TEDxBerlin. The conference was aptly themed “High Energy.”

Fair, a frequent contributor to OnEarth, is best know for his “Industrial Scars” photo series, which exposes landscapes destroyed by the actions of extractive industries, such as mountaintop removal coal mining, clearcutting forests, or the Gulf oil spill.

In his talk, Fair draws a connection between the actions of individuals and the blighted — yet surreally beautiful — scenes depicted by his photography. But really, the images speak for themselves.

During drought periods, we sell firewood. It takes an hour to collect the firewood and then
another two hours to walk to Lalibela. And we go at 4.00am, even 3.00 am. And if we don’t
manage to sell the firewood in the morning, we will have to stay in the market all day and it
stops me from going to school.
Melkam, schoolgirl, 14 years, Lalibela, Ethiopia
climateadaptation:

Up to 900 tropical bird species could ‘go extinct’
“The finding is modelled on the effects of a 3.5C Earth surface temperature rise, a Biological Conservation Journal paper shows.
Species may struggle to adapt to habitat loss and extreme weather events, author Cagan Sekercioglu says.
Mountain, coastal, restricted-range, and species unable to get to higher elevations could be the worst affected.
Depending on future habitat loss, each degree of surface warming could affect between 100-500 species, says Mr Sekercioglu, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah.”
BBC Nature

climateadaptation:

Up to 900 tropical bird species could ‘go extinct’

“The finding is modelled on the effects of a 3.5C Earth surface temperature rise, a Biological Conservation Journal paper shows.

Species may struggle to adapt to habitat loss and extreme weather events, author Cagan Sekercioglu says.

Mountain, coastal, restricted-range, and species unable to get to higher elevations could be the worst affected.

Depending on future habitat loss, each degree of surface warming could affect between 100-500 species, says Mr Sekercioglu, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah.”

BBC Nature

Year 8

An example of how you would write this source in a bibliography:

Rapoza, Kenneth. Is Brazil Destroying The Amazon For Energy? 2/27/12. http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2012/02/27/is-brazil-destroying-the-amazon-for-energy/?feed=rss_home

#geographyteacher

visualoop:

Via

#geographyteacher

climateadaptation:

Industry written bill protects farmers who illegally logged rainforest prior to 2008. Rouseff claims she will veto…