Teacher LP

climateadaptation:

Reuters: Hundreds of Orangutans in Indonesia’s Aceh forest may die out in weeks

“Forest fires and land clearing by palm oil firms could kill off within weeks about 200 orangutans in a forest in western Indonesia, an environmental group said on Wednesday.

The orangutans, part of a population of around 6,600 on Sumatra island, used to live in a lush forest and peatland region called Rawa Tripa on the coast of Indonesia’s Aceh province. But more than two-thirds of the area has been divided up into palm oil concessions, said the Coalition to Save Tripa.

Graham Usher, a member of the coalition and a landscape protection specialist, said satellite images showed forest fires had been burning in Tripa since last week, and if allowed to continue they could wipe out orangutans already forced onto the edge of remaining forests.

“If there is any prolonged dry spell, which is quite likely, there’s a very good chance that the whole piece of forest and everything in it, so that’s orangutans, sun bears, tigers, and all the other protected species in it, will disappear in a few weeks and will be gone permanently,” he told a news conference.

The palm oil industry has expanded to make Indonesia the world’s top producer and exporter of the edible oil, used to make good ranging from cooking oil and biodiesel to biscuits and soap to feed growing Asian consumer demand.

Deforestation has threatened animals like the Sumatran tiger and Javan rhino and pushed up carbon dioxide emissions. The Bali tiger and the Java tiger have disappeared in the last 70 years.

A two-year moratorium on new permits to clear primary forests came into effect in Indonesia last year, part of a $1 billion deal with Norway to cut emissions and slow expansion of plantations. But the moratorium was breached in Aceh on its first days, an environmental group has said.

The last Aceh permit for palm oil was issued by former Aceh governor Irwandi Yusuf in August last year to PT Kallista Alam, prompting environmental group Walhi to file a legal suit against Yusuf. A court verdict is expected next week.”

More at Reuters.

climateadaptation:

Palm oil is delicious. It’s used in crackers and candy. It’s a plant that’s grown in tropical areas, mostly Indonesia. Rainforests are burned down to make room to plant the crop. Tens of thousands of animals are killed by the burning. This short video shows the impacts of palm oil production on orangutans. It’s one of three tough-to-stomach documentaries on rainforest destruction.

WARNING: This video is brutal and raw. Guys, I am not messing around here. Parts are extremely graphic.

Her name is GREEN, she is alone in a world that doesn’t belong to her. She is a female orangutan, victim of deforestation and resource exploitation. This film is an emotional journey with GREEN’s final days. With no narration, it is a visual ride presenting the devastating impacts of logging and land clearing for palm oil plantations, the choking haze created by rainforest fires and the tragic end of rainforest biodiversity. We watch the effects of consumerism and are faced with our personal accountability in the loss of the world’s rainforest treasures.

More from Green Planet Films.

onearth:

From aircraft flying high above Earth, photographer J Henry Fair captures the industrial footprint humans leave behind from unique angles. His beautiful and startling aerial photography was the centerpiece of a talk given last fall at the TEDxBerlin. The conference was aptly themed “High Energy.”

Fair, a frequent contributor to OnEarth, is best know for his “Industrial Scars” photo series, which exposes landscapes destroyed by the actions of extractive industries, such as mountaintop removal coal mining, clearcutting forests, or the Gulf oil spill.

In his talk, Fair draws a connection between the actions of individuals and the blighted — yet surreally beautiful — scenes depicted by his photography. But really, the images speak for themselves.

During drought periods, we sell firewood. It takes an hour to collect the firewood and then
another two hours to walk to Lalibela. And we go at 4.00am, even 3.00 am. And if we don’t
manage to sell the firewood in the morning, we will have to stay in the market all day and it
stops me from going to school.
Melkam, schoolgirl, 14 years, Lalibela, Ethiopia
climateadaptation:

Up to 900 tropical bird species could ‘go extinct’
“The finding is modelled on the effects of a 3.5C Earth surface temperature rise, a Biological Conservation Journal paper shows.
Species may struggle to adapt to habitat loss and extreme weather events, author Cagan Sekercioglu says.
Mountain, coastal, restricted-range, and species unable to get to higher elevations could be the worst affected.
Depending on future habitat loss, each degree of surface warming could affect between 100-500 species, says Mr Sekercioglu, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah.”
BBC Nature

climateadaptation:

Up to 900 tropical bird species could ‘go extinct’

“The finding is modelled on the effects of a 3.5C Earth surface temperature rise, a Biological Conservation Journal paper shows.

Species may struggle to adapt to habitat loss and extreme weather events, author Cagan Sekercioglu says.

Mountain, coastal, restricted-range, and species unable to get to higher elevations could be the worst affected.

Depending on future habitat loss, each degree of surface warming could affect between 100-500 species, says Mr Sekercioglu, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah.”

BBC Nature

Year 8

An example of how you would write this source in a bibliography:

Rapoza, Kenneth. Is Brazil Destroying The Amazon For Energy? 2/27/12. http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2012/02/27/is-brazil-destroying-the-amazon-for-energy/?feed=rss_home

#geographyteacher

visualoop:

Via