Teacher LP

micdotcom:

Finally some good international news: Child mortality is at its lowest level in decades

Daily news of turmoil in global hotspots often paints a picture of a world in shambles. But according to a new UNICEF report, quality of life around the world is gradually improving. 

Not only is global poverty on the decline, the improvements in child welfare have been dramatic. Between 1990 and 2013, the mortality rate among children under the age of 5 has been sliced in half. 

But there’s still a long road ahead 

More found here:
http://earthweareone.com/these-29-clever-drawings-will-make-you-question-everything-wrong-with-the-world/
thelandofmaps:

The blue countries in this map have more than half of the world’s GDP but only 1/10th of its population [2628x1196][OC]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

The blue countries in this map have more than half of the world’s GDP but only 1/10th of its population [2628x1196][OC]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

Which countries match the GDP and population of Brazil’s states? [527x557]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

Which countries match the GDP and population of Brazil’s states? [527x557]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

There you go

From Survival International.  More information here: 

http://www.survivalinternational.org/thereyougo

newstfionline:

News.com.au, January 21, 2014

The world’s 85 richest individuals now own as much as the poorest half of the 7 billion global population, according to a report released by Oxfam.

The world’s elite have rigged laws in their own favour undermining democracy and creating a chasm of inequality across…


Wealthy nations pledged billions to help the poor adapt to climate change. Where did it all go?
What does this climate aid actually look like? Where has it all gone so far? And are wealthy nations really going to put up $100 billion per year in climate finance in the years to come? Here’s a breakdown:
—2010-2012: The first $35 billion in climate aid. Between 2010 and 2012, the world’s wealthy nations say they provided $35 billion to help poorer countries adjust to climate change, as promised at Copenhagen. (You can see a full breakdown of these pledges from the World Resources Institute here.)
The vast majority of that aid — $27 billion — came from five countries: Germany, Japan, Norway, Britain, and the United States. And most of it went toward clean energy, efficiency, and other mitigation projects around the world. Only a small slice, about $5 billion, went toward helping poor countries prepare for the actual impacts of climate change, like droughts or heat waves.
For instance, Norway gave Brazil $1 billion to help prevent deforestation. The United States gave the Congo Basin $15.7 million to preserve rain forest biodiversity. Japan gave Egypt a $338 million loan for wind power. Via
WaPo

Wealthy nations pledged billions to help the poor adapt to climate change. Where did it all go?

What does this climate aid actually look like? Where has it all gone so far? And are wealthy nations really going to put up $100 billion per year in climate finance in the years to come? Here’s a breakdown:

—2010-2012: The first $35 billion in climate aid. Between 2010 and 2012, the world’s wealthy nations say they provided $35 billion to help poorer countries adjust to climate change, as promised at Copenhagen. (You can see a full breakdown of these pledges from the World Resources Institute here.)

The vast majority of that aid — $27 billion — came from five countries: Germany, Japan, Norway, Britain, and the United States. And most of it went toward clean energy, efficiency, and other mitigation projects around the world. Only a small slice, about $5 billion, went toward helping poor countries prepare for the actual impacts of climate change, like droughts or heat waves.

For instance, Norway gave Brazil $1 billion to help prevent deforestation. The United States gave the Congo Basin $15.7 million to preserve rain forest biodiversity. Japan gave Egypt a $338 million loan for wind power. Via

Year 11 & 13 Watch this NOW!