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onearth:

From aircraft flying high above Earth, photographer J Henry Fair captures the industrial footprint humans leave behind from unique angles. His beautiful and startling aerial photography was the centerpiece of a talk given last fall at the TEDxBerlin. The conference was aptly themed “High Energy.”

Fair, a frequent contributor to OnEarth, is best know for his “Industrial Scars” photo series, which exposes landscapes destroyed by the actions of extractive industries, such as mountaintop removal coal mining, clearcutting forests, or the Gulf oil spill.

In his talk, Fair draws a connection between the actions of individuals and the blighted — yet surreally beautiful — scenes depicted by his photography. But really, the images speak for themselves.

A woman in rural Ethiopia can have ten children and her family will still do less damage, and consume fewer resources, than the family of the average soccer mom in Minnesota or Manchester or Munich.

The Earth is Full

A good resource for IB core 4

npr:

With Americans consuming 300 million gallons of gasoline every day, this really is a billion-dollar question. The answer? It’s complicated. The U.S. is the world’s biggest gasoline consumer, and it increasingly relies on imports of foreign crude oil to meet that need. Global crude supply and demand, which is influenced by politics, speculation and natural disasters, has a powerful effect on the cost of gas in America. Federal and state taxes, regulations and the cost of distribution top off prices at the pump. (via What’s Behind These High Gas Prices? : NPR)

Source: Energy Information Administration
Credit: Adam Cole, Julia Ro / NPR

npr:

With Americans consuming 300 million gallons of gasoline every day, this really is a billion-dollar question. The answer? It’s complicated. The U.S. is the world’s biggest gasoline consumer, and it increasingly relies on imports of foreign crude oil to meet that need. Global crude supply and demand, which is influenced by politics, speculation and natural disasters, has a powerful effect on the cost of gas in America. Federal and state taxes, regulations and the cost of distribution top off prices at the pump. (via What’s Behind These High Gas Prices? : NPR)