Teacher LP
onearth:

Would you show your Facebook friends how much electricity you use? A new app is harnessing the power of social media – the peer pressure, camaraderie, and good old-fashioned competition – to inspire people to improve their energy habits: Can Facebook Help Good Energy Habits Go Viral?

onearth:

Would you show your Facebook friends how much electricity you use? A new app is harnessing the power of social media – the peer pressure, camaraderie, and good old-fashioned competition – to inspire people to improve their energy habits: Can Facebook Help Good Energy Habits Go Viral?

fastcompany:

Watch this time-lapsed video of one of the country’s largest and least sustainable cities, Las Vegas, as it inexorably expands and sucks up the resources around it.

Learn more about this video->

Don´t just check this one articel out, there are lots of interesting articles and ideas on the website such as Eco-Tourism Or Eco-Terrorism? and

Tourism, Globalisation and Sustainable Development

onearth:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

sexyactionplanet:

This is actually a really good book by Alan Weisman about what would happen to the world if human beings just simply vanished. What would happen to our buildings and cities, the landscape, animal populations and more if human maintenance and pressure just disappeared… It is very eye-opening and some of it is very surprising! A fantastic read I highly recommend. Find out more here.

I’d like to take a minute to point out that this book is so good that sexyactionplanet borrowed it and NEVER GAVE IT BACK. To be fair, it is an excellent read and a real eye opener. 

Seconding (or thirding, or howevermany-ing) this recommendation. GREAT BOOK! We were very, very fortunate to have the great and brilliant Sharman Apt Russell review it for us when it came out.

onearth:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

sexyactionplanet:

This is actually a really good book by Alan Weisman about what would happen to the world if human beings just simply vanished. What would happen to our buildings and cities, the landscape, animal populations and more if human maintenance and pressure just disappeared… It is very eye-opening and some of it is very surprising! A fantastic read I highly recommend. Find out more here.

I’d like to take a minute to point out that this book is so good that sexyactionplanet borrowed it and NEVER GAVE IT BACK. To be fair, it is an excellent read and a real eye opener. 

Seconding (or thirding, or howevermany-ing) this recommendation. GREAT BOOK! We were very, very fortunate to have the great and brilliant Sharman Apt Russell review it for us when it came out.

skeptv:

Katherine Lorenz - Perspectives on Limits to Growth

The Club of Rome and the Smithsonian Institution’s Consortium for Understanding and Sustaining a Biodiverse Planet hosted a one-day symposium on March 1, 2012 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the launching of Limits to Growth, the first report to the Club of Rome published in 1972. This book was one of the earliest scholarly works to recognize that the world was fast approaching its sustainable limits. Forty years later, the planet continues to face many of the same economic, social, and environmental challenges as when the book was first published.

The morning session focused on the lessons of Limits to Growth. The afternoon session addressed the difficult challenges of preserving biodiversity, adjusting to a changing climate, and solving the societal issues now facing the planet. The symposium ended with a thought-provoking panel discussion among the speakers on future steps for building a sustainable planet.

The symposium was webcast live, and has been archived for later viewing, on this page. An event program is available for download (http://si.edu/Content/consortia/limits-to-growth.pdf) along with the PowerPoint presentation from speaker Dennis Meadows (http://si.edu/Content/consortia/Dennis_Meadows.pptx).

Katherine Lorenz was elected President of the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation in January 2011. Before taking on this role, she served nearly three years as Deputy Director for the Institute for Philanthropy, whose mission is to increase effective philanthropy in the UK and internationally, and she now sits on the Institute’s Board of Directors. Prior to her work with the Institute for Philanthropy, Ms. Lorenz lived and worked in Oaxaca, Mexico for nearly six years where she co-founded Puente a la Salud Comunitaria, a non-profit organization working to eradicate malnutrition and advance food sovereignty in rural Oaxaca through the integration of amaranth into the local diet. She continues to be highly involved with Puente’s work as an active Board Member. Before founding Puente, Lorenz spent two summers living and working in rural, poor communities in Latin America with the volunteer program Amigos de las Américas and later served on their Program Committee and as a trustee of the Foundation for Amigos de las Américas. Additionally, she currently serves on the Boards of Directors of the Endowment for Regional Sustainability Science and the Amaranth Institute and formerly was a Board Member of Resource Generation. Along with her family, Ms. Lorenz is a member of the Global Philanthropists Circle (through the Synergos Institute) and is an active participant in the GPC Next Generation subgroup. She sits on the Council on Foundations Committee on Family Philanthropy and serves on their 2012 Family Philanthropy Conference Planning Task Force. Ms. Lorenz holds a B.A. in Economics and Spanish from Davidson College.